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Public art on Vector network assets

Community

Public art on Vector network assets

Vector is the owner of the electricity and gas infrastructure that brings power to more than 1.6m Aucklanders. Our infrastructure – everything from large zone substations to small roadside transformers or cabinets – is spread throughout our communities. No matter what part of Auckland you live in, our infrastructure is part of your local neighbourhood. 

That’s why we’re happy to work with local artists and other organisations who want to take ownership of their spaces and make them look great. 

We’ve published guidelines that set out our approach to facilitating requests for public art on Vector’s network assets.

There are some important things to know about our approach:

  • We’re happy to hear from you with any requests for public art or other beautification of our assets;

  • For a variety of reasons, including fairness across all our communities, if requests are accepted they will be at your expense;

  • We take care for the health and safety of the public and our environment, and we expect you to do the same if you’re working with our assets; and

  • While these are our assets, they’re part of your community. We expect you to take ownership of your artwork through the process.

Want to know more?

Have a look at the Mural Art Request guidelines or contact us at murals@vector.co.nz.

Want some inspiration?

We’ve been lucky enough to work with artists and communities on more than 80 different public art displays that reflect the communities our assets are part of. Have a look through our gallery below.

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Jeremy Shirley: This design celebrates the cultural diversity of Avondale through colour and geometric design often featured in indigenous cultures.
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Mandy Patmore: A reminder of Oratia’s orchard past.
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Diane Ruth Rimmer: Multi-cultural symbols.
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Monique Endt: Located in a new subdivision development, this design depicts the surrounding nature and township of Swanson.
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Askew One: One of the first public works completed by the artist, the design was based on 3D scans of the distinctive Plane tree leaves.
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Heathermeg Sampson: The scene on this transformer depicts the typical houses, gardens and bush of the Titirangi area.
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Charles & Janine Williams: Named ‘Hihi – Ray of Sun’, this two-piece mural is located on a substation covered with solar panels.
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Numa McKenzie: This design was themed around transport alternatives to driving, with a youth and popular culture-centric feel.
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Sean McCarthy: The design on this transformer depicts memorabilia from the days of Crown Lynn tableware.
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Elise Lanigan & Isobel Butler: Africa’s Animal Kingdom.
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